Devils Claw

Updated | 2017-11-30


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Devils Claw


Overview

Botanical Name: Harpagophytum procumbens


Order: Lamiales


Family: Pedaliaceae


The tubers (roots) of the devil’s claw are primarily used in herbal medicines. Supplements containing devil’s claw roots should contain at least 1.2% harpagoside, the proposed active compound.



Evidence

Strong:

-

Good:

  • Low Back Pain, may have comparable anti-inflammatory abilities to non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) [1-5]
  • Osteoarthritis/Joint Pain, may have comparable anti-inflammatory abilities to non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) [6-10]

Promising:

-

Conflicting (Unclear):

-

Limited Evidence:

-

No Evidence:


No Clinical Research:

All other conditions.


Side Effects
Side effects may include:
  • Allergic Reactions
  • Diarrhea
  • Gastrointestinal Upset
  • Headache
  • Nausea
Precautions and Adverse Events:
  • Avoid or contact a licensed healthcare practitioner, if you have gastric (stomach) or duodenal ulcers, gallbladder stones.
  • Several reports of anorexia, loss of taste, and tinnitus may have been caused by devil’s claw.
  • Use caution if you have diabetes as devil’s claw may affect your blood sugar.
[12-15]


Pregnant or Nursing

There is not enough research on the use of supplements containing devil’s claw during pregnancy and breast-feeding, so consult a licensed healthcare practitioner before use or avoid use. [12-15]



Interactions

Major

-

Moderate

-

Potential

  • Drugs changed by Cytochrome P450s (CYPs) in the liver
  • Drugs transported by P-glycoproteins
  • Warfarin
  • Anti-Diabetic Drugs
[16-17]


Dosage

Devil's claw is not a "drug", so the best doses have not been thoroughly established. Make sure to follow the specific product instructions and take as directed on the label, or consult a licensed healthcare practitioner before use.



Compounds
Devils Claw compounds


References

1. Chrubasik S, Junck H, Breitschwerdt H, Conradt C, Zappe H. Effectiveness of Harpagophytum extract WS 1531 in the treatment of exacerbation of low back pain: a randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind study. Eur J Anaesthesiol. 1999 Feb;16(2):118-29. 2. Chrubasik S, Künzel O, Thanner J, Conradt C, Black A. A 1-year follow-up after a pilot study with Doloteffin for low back pain. Phytomedicine. 2005 Jan;12(1-2):1-9. 3. Chrubasik S, Model A, Black A, Pollak S. A randomized double-blind pilot study comparing Doloteffin and Vioxx in the treatment of low back pain. Rheumatology (Oxford). 2003 Jan;42(1):141-8. 4. Chrubasik S, Thanner J, Künzel O, Conradt C, Black A, Pollak S. Comparison of outcome measures during treatment with the proprietary Harpagophytum extract doloteffin in patients with pain in the lower back, knee or hip. Phytomedicine. 2002 Apr;9(3):181-94. 5. Laudahn D, Walper A. Efficacy and tolerance of Harpagophytum extract LI 174 in patients with chronic non-radicular back pain. Phytother Res. 2001 Nov;15(7):621-4. 6. Chantre P, Cappelaere A, Leblan D, Guedon D, Vandermander J, Fournie B. Efficacy and tolerance of Harpagophytum procumbens versus diacerhein in treatment of osteoarthritis. Phytomedicine. 2000 Jun;7(3):177-83. 7. Chrubasik S, Thanner J, Künzel O, Conradt C, Black A, Pollak S. Comparison of outcome measures during treatment with the proprietary Harpagophytum extract doloteffin in patients with pain in the lower back, knee or hip. Phytomedicine. 2002 Apr;9(3):181-94. 8. Leblan D, Chantre P, Fournié B. Harpagophytum procumbens in the treatment of knee and hip osteoarthritis. Four-month results of a prospective, multicenter, double-blind trial versus diacerhein. Joint Bone Spine. 2000;67(5):462-7. 9. Warnock M, McBean D, Suter A, Tan J, Whittaker P. Effectiveness and safety of Devil's Claw tablets in patients with general rheumatic disorders. Phytother Res. 2007 Dec;21(12):1228-33. 10. Wegener T, Lüpke NP. Treatment of patients with arthrosis of hip or knee with an aqueous extract of devil's claw (Harpagophytum procumbens DC.). Phytother Res. 2003 Dec;17(10):1165-72. 11. Moussard C, Alber D, Toubin MM, Thevenon N, Henry JC. A drug used in traditional medicine, harpagophytum procumbens: no evidence for NSAID-like effect on whole blood eicosanoid production in human. Prostaglandins Leukot Essent Fatty Acids. 1992 Aug;46(4):283-6. 12. DerMarderosian A, Beutler JA. The review of natural products: the most complete source of natural product information. 7th ed. St. Louis, MO, USA: Wolters Kluwer Health; 2012. 13. Fetrow CW, Avila JR. The complete guide to herbal medicines. Spring House, PA, USA: Springhouse Corporation; 2000. 14. Gruenwald J, Brendler T, Jaenicke C, editors. PDR for herbal medicines. 4th ed. Montvale, NJ, USA: Thomson Healthcare; 2007. 15. Vlachojannis J, Roufogalis BD, Chrubasik S. Systematic review on the safety of Harpagophytum preparations for osteoarthritic and low back pain. Phytother Res. 2008 Feb;22(2):149-52. 16. DerMarderosian A, Beutler JA. The review of natural products: the most complete source of natural product information. 7th ed. St. Louis, MO, USA: Wolters Kluwer Health; 2012. 17. Vlachojannis J, Roufogalis BD, Chrubasik S. Systematic review on the safety of Harpagophytum preparations for osteoarthritic and low back pain. Phytother Res. 2008 Feb;22(2):149-52.

The "-" means that there is no information.