Gumweed

Updated | 2018-10-29


See what others say about Gumweed:



Gumweed


Overview

Botanical Name: Grindelia


Order: Asterales


Family: Asteraceae


Named after the gummy resin this plant produces. One distinguishing feature of this genus (i.e., Grindelia) is that the young flowers produce large amounts of this resin. Most plants used in manufacturing herbal supplements containing gumweed are native to western North America.



Evidence

Strong:

-

Good:

-

Promising:

-

Conflicting (Unclear):

-

Limited Evidence:

  • Treatment of Poison Oak Skin Rash [1]

No Evidence:

-

No Clinical Research:

All other conditions.


Side Effects
Side effects may include:
  • Diarrhea
  • Gastrointestinal Upset
Precautions and Adverse Events:
  • Avoid or contact a licensed healthcare practitioner, if you have allergies to plants in the family Asteraceae (ragweed, chamomile, etc.), and use caution, since there is not enough research on the use of supplements containing gumweed.
  • Large doses of gumweed are said to be poisonous.
[2]


Pregnant or Nursing

There is not enough research on the use of supplements containing gumweed during pregnancy and breast-feeding, so consult a licensed healthcare practitioner before use or avoid use. [2]



Interactions

Major

-

Moderate

-

Potential

-


Dosage

Gumweed is not a "drug", so the best doses have not been thoroughly established. Make sure to follow the specific product instructions and take as directed on the label, or consult a licensed healthcare practitioner before use.



Compounds
Gumweed compounds


References

1. Canavan D, Yarnell E. Successful treatment of poison oak dermatitis treated with Grindelia spp. (Gumweed). J Altern Complement Med. 2005 Aug;11(4):709-10. 2. Gruenwald J, Brendler T, Jaenicke C, editors. PDR for herbal medicines. 4th ed. Montvale, NJ, USA: Thomson Healthcare; 2007.

The "-" means that there is no information.