Yellow Sweet Clover Supplement

Updated | 2021-01-26

Written and reviewed by the NatureClaim Team


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Yellow Sweet Clover


Overview of Yellow Sweet Clover

Botanical Name: Melilotus officinalis


Order: Fabales


Family: Fabaceae


Yellow sweet clover is native to Eurasia, but has also been introduced throughout the temperate world.



Evidence

Strong:

insufficient information

Good:

insufficient information

Promising:

insufficient information

Conflicting (Unclear):

insufficient information

Limited Evidence:

  • Capillary Fragility, a patch containing yellow sweet clover [1]
  • Diabetic Cystoid Macular Edema, yellow sweet clover combined with flavonoids / Centella asiatica [2-3]
  • Postoperative Swelling and Bruising [4]
  • Varicose Syndrome, a patch containing yellow sweet clover [5]

No Evidence:

Cellulite [6]

No Clinical Research:

All other conditions.


Side Effects
Side effects may include:
  • Side effects have not been studied.
Precautions and Adverse Events:
  • Use caution or contact a licensed healthcare practitioner, since there is not enough research on the use of supplements containing yellow sweet clover.
  • Yellow sweet clover may cause liver damage; monitor liver while taking this herb.
[7]


Pregnant or Nursing

There is not enough research on the use of supplements containing yellow sweet clover during pregnancy and breast-feeding, so consult a licensed healthcare practitioner before use or avoid use.



Interactions

Major:

  • A yellow sweet clover/coumarin combination caused severe liver dysfunction in a patient taking IFNB-1b
  • IFNB-1b
[8]

Moderate:

insufficient information

Potential:

insufficient information


Dosage

Yellow sweet clover is not a "drug", the best doses have not been thoroughly established. Make sure to follow the specific product instructions and take as directed on the label, or consult a licensed healthcare practitioner before use.





References

1. Minghetti P, Casiraghi A, Cilurzo F, Montanari L. Development of local patches containing melilot extract and ex vivo-in vivo evaluation of skin permeation. Eur J Pharm Sci. 2000 Apr;10(2):111-7. 2. Forte R, Cennamo G, Bonavolontà P, Pascotto A, de Crecchio G, et al. Long-term follow-up of oral administration of flavonoids, Centella asiatica and Melilotus, for diabetic cystoid macular edema without macular thickening. J Ocul Pharmacol Ther. 2013 Oct;29(8):733-7. 3. Forte R, Cennamo G, Finelli ML, Bonavolontà P, de Crecchio G, et al. Combination of flavonoids with Centella asiatica and Melilotus for diabetic cystoid macular edema without macular thickening. J Ocul Pharmacol Ther. 2011 Apr;27(2):109-13. 4. Xu F, Zeng W, Mao X, Fan GK. The efficacy of melilotus extract in the management of postoperative ecchymosis and edema after simultaneous rhinoplasty and blepharoplasty. Aesthetic Plast Surg. 2008 Jul;32(4):599-603. 5. Minghetti P, Casiraghi A, Cilurzo F, Montanari L. Development of local patches containing melilot extract and ex vivo-in vivo evaluation of skin permeation. Eur J Pharm Sci. 2000 Apr;10(2):111-7. 6. Lis-Balchin M. Parallel placebo-controlled clinical study of a mixture of herbs sold as a remedy for cellulite. Phytother Res. 1999 Nov;13(7):627-9. 7. Gruenwald J, Brendler T, Jaenicke C, editors. PDR for herbal medicines. 4th ed. Montvale, NJ, USA: Thomson Healthcare; 2007. 8. Tamura S, Warabi Y, Matsubara S. Severe liver dysfunction possibly caused by the combination of interferon beta-1b therapy and melilot (sweet clover) supplement. J Clin Pharm Ther. 2012 Dec;37(6):724-5. 9. Afendi FM, Okada T, Yamazaki M, Hirai-Morita A, Nakamura Y, Nakamura K, Ikeda S, Takahashi H, Altaf-Ul-Amin M, Darusman LK, Saito K, Kanaya S. KNApSAcK family databases: integrated metabolite-plant species databases for multifaceted plant research. Plant Cell Physiol. 2012 Feb;53(2):e1.