Yohimbe

Updated | 2018-10-29


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Yohimbe


Overview

Botanical Name: Pausinystalia johimbe


Order: Gentianales


Family: Rubiaceae


Extracts from the bark of yohimbe are used as an aphrodisiac. Although there is not enough information about the use of yohimbe bark, yohimbine, a compound isolated from yohimbe is going through human clinical trials to treat male erectile dysfunction and boost testosterone. Do NOT confuse yohimbe with yohimbine.



Evidence

Strong:

-

Good:

-

Promising:

-

Conflicting (Unclear):

-

Limited Evidence:

  • Frees up Fatty Acids for Energy, yohimbe with higenamine / caffeine [1]

No Evidence:

-

No Clinical Research:

All other conditions.


Side Effects
Side effects may include:
  • Agitation
  • Anxiety
  • Appetite Loss
  • Blurred Vision
  • Diarrhea
  • Dizziness
  • Elevated Blood Pressure
  • Exanthema
  • Flushed Skin
  • Genital Pain
  • Headache
  • Insomnia
  • Irritability
  • Nausea
  • Nervousness
  • Painful Urination
  • Rapid Pulse
  • Tachycardia
  • Tremors
  • Vomiting
  • Weakness
Precautions and Adverse Events:
  • Avoid or contact a licensed healthcare practitioner, if you have psychiatric disorders, kidney disease, liver disease, ulcers, digestive problems, inflammation of the sexual organs or prostate gland, or are allergic to yohimbe and/or yohimbine.
  • Purified yohimbine from yohimbe bark can cause severe adverse events and even death.
  • A young child died within 90 minutes after ingesting several 100mg yohimbine tablets.
  • There was a case of prolonged erection caused by taking yohimbe bark extract.
  • Yohimbe may cause liver and kidney failure.
  • Do NOT give yohimbe to children.
[2-7]


Pregnant or Nursing

There is not enough research on the use of supplements containing yohimbe during pregnancy and breast-feeding, so consult a licensed healthcare practitioner before use or avoid use. However, it is advised that yohimbe should NOT be used during pregnancy and breast-feeding. [2-7]



Interactions

Major

  • A patient taking yohimbe with Desipramine had a manic episode
  • Desipramine
[8-10]

Moderate

  • Sibutramine
[8-10]

Potential

  • Alcohol
  • Anti-Depressants
  • Anti-Hypertensives
  • Caffeine
  • Carbamazepine
  • Clomipramine
  • Clonidine
  • Guanabenz, Guanadrel, Guanethidine, and Guanfacine
  • Lithium
  • Minoxidil
  • Morphine
  • Naloxone
  • Naltrexone
  • Phenylephrine
  • Phenylpropanolamine
  • Reserpine
  • Valproic Acid
  • Tyramine Containing Foods, such as aged cheese and wine
[8-10]


Dosage

Yohimbe is not a "drug", the best doses have not been thoroughly established. Make sure to follow the specific product instructions and take as directed on the label, or consult a licensed healthcare practitioner before use. Overdose may lead to salivation, dilation of pupils, evacuation, hypotension, and heart disorders and even death through heart failure. [11]



Compounds
Yohimbe compounds


References

1. Lee SR, Schriefer JM, Gunnels TA, Harvey IC, Bloomer RJ. Acute oral intake of a higenamine-based dietary supplement increases circulating free fatty acids and energy expenditure in human subjects. Lipids Health Dis. 2013 Oct 21;12:148. 2. Fetrow CW, Avila JR. The complete guide to herbal medicines. Spring House, PA, USA: Springhouse Corporation; 2000. 3. Gruenwald J, Brendler T, Jaenicke C, editors. PDR for herbal medicines. 4th ed. Montvale, NJ, USA: Thomson Healthcare; 2007. 4. Haller CA, Anderson IB, Kim SY, Blanc PD. An evaluation of selected herbal reference texts and comparison to published reports of adverse herbal events. Adverse Drug React Toxicol Rev. 2002;21(3):143-50. 5. Myers A, Barrueto F Jr. Refractory priapism associated with ingestion of yohimbe extract. J Med Toxicol. 2009 Dec;5(4):223-5. 6. Pittler MH, Schmidt K, Ernst E. Adverse events of herbal food supplements for body weight reduction: systematic review. Obes Rev. 2005 May;6(2):93-111. 7. Tsai HH, Lin HW, Simon Pickard A, Tsai HY, Mahady GB. Evaluation of documented drug interactions and contraindications associated with herbs and dietary supplements: a systematic literature review. Int J Clin Pract. 2012 Nov;66(11):1056-78. 8. Fetrow CW, Avila JR. The complete guide to herbal medicines. Spring House, PA, USA: Springhouse Corporation; 2000. 9. Gruenwald J, Brendler T, Jaenicke C, editors. PDR for herbal medicines. 4th ed. Montvale, NJ, USA: Thomson Healthcare; 2007. 10. Tsai HH, Lin HW, Simon Pickard A, Tsai HY, Mahady GB. Evaluation of documented drug interactions and contraindications associated with herbs and dietary supplements: a systematic literature review. Int J Clin Pract. 2012 Nov;66(11):1056-78. 11. Gruenwald J, Brendler T, Jaenicke C, editors. PDR for herbal medicines. 4th ed. Montvale, NJ, USA: Thomson Healthcare; 2007.

The "-" means there is no information.